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at some point. the loss of credibility for ten years, it is unacceptable in the u.n. cannot define what you mean by unacceptable. those will be what will have to be applied. >> let me ask you two other questions, one narrow and won broad. >> fight that battle over whether we can negotiate or not. because we come to the point of what to do about the program and we need to demonstrate a level to find a diplomatic solution. >> negotiation -- [talking over each other] >> we cannot afford open-ended negotiation. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the ame
of this stuff. it's out in the open. it's up on the websites of u.n., european union, the american bar association, the deans of most law schools in american universities, leading american foundations. it's all there on the internet. people are not talking about world government anybody, but world governance, a form of transnational governance. look at four people, quick views, and talbot, the president of the brookings institution, a major think tank in washington. the former secretary of state, and as a journalist for time magazine in the 1990s, they wrote an article in which he welcomed super national political authority. he said, quote, "i'll bet within the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete and all states will recognize a single global authority." he concluded saying "the devra davis luges of power upwards of units of administration is basically a positive phenomena." coe, currently, today, the chief legal adviser of the u.s. state department, in other words, he advises the president on what the law is, was gave a major speech last week at georgetown law,
's right out in the open. up on the web sites of u.n., european union, the american bar association, the deans of most law schools at american universities, leading american foundations, it's all there on the internet. and people are not talking about world government anymore, they're talking about global gore nance -- governance, this form of transnational governance. so let's look at four people, quick views of theirs, who have given ideas about this. strobe talbot is currently the president of the brookings institution, he's former secretary of state and as a journalist for time magazine in the 1990s, talbot wrote an article in which he welcomed supernational political authority. he said, quote: i'll bet that within the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete, and all state will recognize a single global authority. he concluded by saying that this devolution of power upwards toward the supernational and downwards toward autonomous units of administration is basically a positive phenomena. harold coe is currently -- today he's the chief legal adviser of the u.
three in israel. the u.n. warns netanyahu to avoid a new cycle of blood shed. and president obama throwing down a challenge to congress as he gets set to begin critical budget talks on friday. >>> i want to bring you the italian gdp figures. italy is just the latest p second quarter figures were revised higher to 0.7 contraction from 0.8. third quarter gdp looks like it's fallen 0.2% on the quarter. that's better than was expected. it was expected to fall by about half a%. it is down 2.4% on the year. we'll get the rest of the eurozone figures out at the top of the next hour. >>> also coming up, we'll be live in beijing with updates throughout the show as xi jinping it takes over as the head of the communist party. we'll be in frankfurt for a look at how that economy has been affected. gdp showing a slowdown for germany in the third quarter. and we'll hear from the former head of the council of economic advisers austan goolsbee on how the u.s. can avoid falling off the fiscal cliff. plus we'll take you live to tokyo with japan hit by election fever. the yen is falling as a repeate
'm happy to have that discussion with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambassador who had nothing to do with benghazi and was simply making a presentation based on intelligence that she had received and besmirch her reputation is outrageous. >> let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana bash. dana, senators mccain and graham are now firing back at what we just heard the president say. >> that's right. in fact, senator mccain did so on the senate floor. he was going to the senate floor already, wolf, to formally introduce a resolution for a special or select committee for congress to investigate all of the unanswered questions relating to the attack in libya. but he made a point while he was on the floor, again continuing in a very angry tone as we've seen from all of these men to respond to that comment from the president. >> he said not to "pick on his ambassador to the united states to "pick on him." that statement is really remarkable in that if the president thinks that we are picking on people, he really does not have any idea of how serious this issue is. i'm
. they won't let them go to the u.n. and declare statehood. they won't let them govern their own territory in the west bank. the wall that has been constructed and the roadblocks and checkpoints that exist in the settlements that are expand having undercut the legitimacy of that leadership. so what we have got is a situation that only gets worse and that's why the united states has to take a tougher stand. that's why we have to have those who can talk to the folks in hamas and gaza take a tougher position and ultimately bring an end to this. >> that's going to be the last word on that, mr. zogby. >> we're going to go down that road, open the door to hell, we saw it play out before in 2008 and '06 and many times before and ben wedeman is right, all we get is a lot of dead people and we start right back where we were with no peace and people still needing to talk to each other. >> james zogby, president of the arab-american institute. thank you for your time, sir. >>> back to the united states. we have a story developing now. two people now, two people are missing and two people are believed
important element, the u.n. dimension: respect for the territorial integrity and independence of iraq. so that meant that the action team could not go to nondeclared facilities. only delareed facilities could be -- declared facilities could be inspected. but then the security council formed out that right to, i would say, break the integrity to the -- [inaudible] so they were charged with nondeclared facilities and activities. of course, then it was, obviously, chemical, biological. but the beauty of these wars that it's tough sanctions system was in place. we have to have that also. but immediately when the inspection started, the sanction system was gradually released. so this was a functioning system, good behavior led also to these single sanctions. bad behavior, which happened, of course, quite frequently, some blockages and refusals, was met by some tough language from the security council. not from the israeli government or anyone, it was security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. so, of course, we know that this system works extremely well. it
at the u.n., folks. palestinians get a big reward from that organization. how the u.s. and israel is reacting to that move. we'll tell you. martha: plus everyone from president obama to rapper jay-z is on "time" magazine's short list for person of the year but what does it say about leadership and who we are looking to in america right now when this south korean internet sensation is a serious contender for the magazine's cover page? ♪ . [ malannouncer ] it'that time of year again. time for cii price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supp
the ambassador. he wants to push the issue into play at the u.n., he's summoned the arab league. morisi does not he ban to attach himself to hamas let alone to the jihaddist groups, smaller ones that are operating in gaza. he has a loan that they are negotiating, a billion-plus in military assistance from the united states. he's got multiple audiences on this. he's going to appear supportive. the question is can he bring his influence? remember, the muslim brotherhood is in fact the foundation stone from which hamas emerged. he does have influence with hamas. they share a common border. hamas has to give some credibility to what he wants and to what he said. the question is, how much time do we have before this escalates to a ground incursion? jon: the palestinians profess they want their own state. hard to argue that you deserve statehood when you're launching rockets at your neighbor. >> you have three states between the mediterranean and the jordan river. have you a weak and dysfunctional palestinian authority which controls 40% of the west bank. you have a highly centralized hamas which
would say she's the key when the president says come after me. she's the un embassador. >> she's the one who talked on the talk shows and i suspect they're not going to subpoena or ask that the president come and testify. susan rice is subject to confirmation, especially if she's going to be the secretary of state. she's going to have to go to capitol hill and answer questions. >> it will be fascinating to see if she ask her or subpoena her and if she appears. always good to see you. >> thanks. >> for more of the interview today with senators saxby chambliss and joe lieberman it airs today. check your local fox station. >> switching gears, the doctors are here for "sunday house call" and they're going to talk about a very important topic, hundreds of thousands of americans suffer from a condition that causes serious digest tick problems, crohn's disease. it can be difficult to diagnose. how do you know if you have it? the doctors are here to help. we're taking your questions on this topic and others right now. go foxnews.com/"sunday house call." the doctors will take one of your question
to the u.n., came up a lot today. >> that story has really got a lot of traction. one republican alleging that president, quote, intentionally misinformed the american people about the attack and now he wants to promote ambassador rice, who said the attack was not premeditated terrorism, but spontaneous. >> president obama has the gall to float the name as possible secretary of state, the name of the person who is the actual vehicle used to misinform the american people during this crisis. >> democrats defended rice, adding the u.n. ambassador got her information from the c.i.a. and other agencies. >> these unfair attacks on ambassador susan rice are simply wrong. she had to rely on the intelligence that was provided. i sat here while colin powell provided the intelligence that he had regarding weapons of mass destruction in iraq. >> this is a critical point. who finalized these talking points for ambassador rice and what was clear in the testimony today is that it was a real flash point between lawmakers and the intelligence community who could not say who ultimately signed off on those
will be coming and making a statement. i think is so important that the character of the un ambassador be clarified. it is our understanding from hearing two days of testimony that in fact what the un ambassador stated was the talking points that had been given approved declassified to the house intelligence committee. that is what i am told she restated. this member is absolutely convinced we are in it -- an accurate reflection of the intelligence community. that could be said at that time in a declassified manner. >> is the issue here that there were talking points that were classified -- >> there are many issues but i when the chairman and vice- chairman to speak as to the un ambassador. i will give a speech on the floor of the senate is still in session. >> we have gained important insights as to what has happened. i still believe there are questions that need to be answered. i think anybody with confusion in the basis of the two hearings, it is a premature conclusion. i am glad we have two morris sessions ahead of us. more people we need to talk to. it was helpful to have patraeus
week high as international pressure mounts for a cease-fire in gaza. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is heading to cairo for emergency negotiations. good morning, welcome to the program packed full of fantastic guests to give you you updates and analysis on where we are in trade. if europe, higher by 0.8%. coming off the 3 1/2 month low that we saw in the close on friday, helped along by optimism on the negotiations to avoid a fiscal cliff state side. we saw quite a rally in the u.s. on friday's close and that is feeding through to europe here this morning. ftse 100 higher by 09%, xetra dax by more than 1% and ibex 35 more than half a percentage point. the bond markets, the question is whether or not we'll see a lid on on bond prices on treasuries especially if we manage to overt a fiscal cliff scenario, if we see productive talks continuing. right now we're seeing the yield on on the ten year bund just a little bit higher. we're seeing a bit of buying taking place in the spanish and italian debt market on the ten year and a little bit of selling on on the gilt. the currency mar
assembly is the the wrong place. >> before being secretary of state, you were the ambassador to the u.n. and you've raised this issue in the past. is the u.n. losing its efficacy, is there a better way going forward to address some of these key issues? >> well, i believe in the u.n. and the security council and what has been interesting is the number of resolutions that have been taken, but ultimately what needs to happen is cooperation i think with a regional organization and one looks at what the tools are for doing something. so nato is a very important part they are in all these activities. so from their vantage point of a professor at this time, i think it is interesting to kind of look at what the tools that are available. but the united nations is the voice of the international community. what is really disappointing is the role that the russians are not playing. by taking a stand that is not helpful in terms of supporting the international community. >> would you extend that to their stance with regard to iran? >> well, i think that the iran situation is different. what is inter
. jon: several republican lawmakers are toning down their criticism of u.n. ambassador susan rice and her handling of the deadly attack on the consulate in libya. ambassador rice was under fire for appearances on the television immediately after the attack where she blamed it on the youtube video. many vocal critics, like senator john mccain are turning up the heat on president obama and the state department. >> the problem is the president of the united states in a debate with mitt romney said that he had said it was a terrorist attack. he hadn't. jon: chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is live in washington. she has more on all of this. so this shift in focus to the state department, what are we learning about that, catherine? report thank you, jon, and good morning. we may learn early as this week when secretary of state hillary clinton will testify on capitol hill about the warnings and intelligence leading up to the 9/11 attack on the consulate. on sunday talk shows leading republicans pointed to what they believe is the culpability of clinton's state departm
.m. eastern. a number of senators have been meeting with u.n. ambassador susan rice in the wake of her comments following the attack on the benghazi consulate. just wrapping up is a brief news conference and statement with senators. here is a look. >> i had a very candid ambassador rice embassador ric and the deputy director of the cia. [inaudible] she said if it was a spontaneous demonstration. it was not. there was telling evidence at that time. >> [inaudible] i am very disappointed in our intelligence community. i think they failed in many ways. i think it would be pretty clear that to explain this episode as related to a video that created a mob that turned into a riot was far-filled. at the end of the day, we are going to get to the bottom of this. we have to have a system that we trust. if you don't know what happened, just say you don't know what happened. you can say "i do not want to give that information." you can say the american people got bad information from president obama in the days after. the question is should they have been given the information at all? if you can d
north korea it strikes me that kim jung un is allowing to some westernized foods and such in. do you foresee anything be an done about the boming and the supposed sunken ship? i don't see any sanctions from the administration on north korea. what specifically president obama dealing with this, i think there are things that should be done. i think he could possibly talk to him and maybe get back to the six party talks. i would like to know your views on that. thank you. guest: i think that's a good point. the new leader in north korea, kim jong un, is in power. but it is a famously closed society. there's certainly a fear of nuclear escalation and there have been shakeups within the north korean military. whether or not that's an internal power struggle, we do not know. one of the top generals was perhaps killed by mortar fire. perhaps that is something that obama will bring to the table on his trip to asia, but i think there is a consistent policy that we want to prevent nuclear escalation in the region and it is true for all sides. japan, south korea, china, and other areas. we just
. jenna: for more on this i'm joined by ambassador dan gillerman, former israeli ambassador to the u.n. and fox news contributor coming to us from tel aviv. you heard what leland reported about patience wearing thin. can the ambassador hear me all all right? >> yes, i can hear you very well. jenna: hi, ambassador -- >> i can hear you loud and clear. can you hear me? jenna: sometimes the delay is a little tough on live television with tel aviv. always great to have you as our guest. leland is saying that patience is running thin with israel. there is engagement with gaza, engagement with syria. how close to you think israel is to being dragged into a more regional conflict? >> well, as you said, patience is running out. israel every day i think feels more and more like a villa in the jungle. we have hundreds of rockets being launched at schools and kindergartens and homes in the south. we have assad butchering over 30,000 civilians and slaughtering his own people in the north and now launching bombs at israel and bombing israeli territory and there's only that much israel will take. isr
mahmoud abbas is expected to appear before the u.n. general assembly in a new bid for palestinian statehood. a move that despite earlier reports from abbas offices doesn't have the support of hamas leaders in gaza. what do all these events mean for lasting peace? executive committee member for the palestinian association, appreciate it. let's begin with negotiations in cairo today. what kind of progress do you expect to see? >> well, progress -- the initial step of cessation of violence has taken place. now the steps that deal with the substance and with more longer term arrangements such as lifting the siege. these steps have to take place. lifting the maritime blockade, sea blockade around gaza. leaving the territory and waters, also air space. more importantly all the crossing points by land. lifting the blockade would mean that gaza is resuming some sort of normal life again despite the israeli occupation. and that the palestinian people of gaza would begin a whole new phase. and that would be a very positive step towards not just conciliation but also peaceful negotiations. >
at the u.n. and e had this graphic -- he had this graphic illustration of the problem, he was, he created what was a new threshold for them. he called it a red line, but a new threshold. they had -- for the previous, i don't know, 6-12 months the israelis had been focusing on, primarily because of the defense minister, ehud barak, the zone of immunity. and what he meant was iran was going to with the character of its nuclear program, the depth, the breadth, the redundancy, the hardening of the nuclear program was going to reach a point where the israelis would actually lose their military option. and no israeli prime minister is going to accept a situation where they face an existential threat, but they no longer have a military option to deal with it. so ehud barak was trying to identify the point at which the zone of immunity was going to kick in. now, he was saying it was going to be the end of 2012. now, he's changed that and said it's been pushed back 8-12 -- 8-10 months. when the prime minister was in new york he focused not on the zone of immunity, he focused on what's the point in
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
. when i look at what's going on this area, to u.n. security council is dysfunctional, not working, not capable of coming to a conclusion. the g20 has not fulfilled, at least not according to me, the expectations we had when this larger body was created. in other words, from a european point of view, you need to worry about the fact that europe will have obviously a smaller portion of the cake in the future. germany is going to a 1% of the worlds population. the e.u. altogether 5%, 40 or so. in other words, what probably needs minority protection. we have a ton about that much. that's a specific problem for europeans, not so much for americans. if that is correct analysis, did we need to worry about global governance. we are capable as long as we are in charge and as long as we still represent to some degree the majority and as long as are capable for helping to shape the international system. we are capable of shaping an international system, which will be sustained even when we are only a minority. in other words, we called the shot. can we reform the u.n., the g20 system and oth
there by u.n. secretary general for what will be a complex bit of diplomacy. the president's aide said mrs. clinton will not be going into gaza and not talking with hamas. >> can assure you she'll be meeting with the palestinian authority. the united states does not engage directly with hamas. hamas has not met the conditions we set. >> president obama voiced his support for israel's right to defend itself at a news conference on this trip. but in his private diplomacy, he has been urging israel to hold off sending troops into gaza and hopes the rocket attacks can be stopped without an escalation of the battle and the much greater casualties that would bring. this is the first international test of egypt's new muslim brotherhood government and while u.s. officials will not compare it with egypt's former president, hosni mubarak, they do say that they are encouraged by the consultation and cooperation they've had from egypt's new leadership. guys, back to you. >> steve: wendell goler in cambodia. >> brian: i don't know what time it is with laura ingraham. >> steve: she's in our time zone. >
diplomats are coming to israel and to 9 region, not just the u.n. secretary-general, but the u.s. secretary of state as you've just said has been dispatched by president obama to meet face-to-face with the principles in this conflict. the prime minister of israel, the president of egypt who is taking the lead in organizing these cease-fire negotiations from the hamas side with israel. soledad? >> christiane, that sounds like the short-term option, right? you sort of try to hold everything down while you negotiate some kind of a short-term peace. what are people saying about the longer-term options here? >> well, you know, there's a lot of devil in the details, as always. you know, each side wants to make sure it's not just a short-term. it's a long-term option. because on the one hand, israel wants a long-term solution to the rockets that are being fired into israel, and into threatening the residents of that area of southern israel close to gaza. on the other hand, the hamas and the palestinians in gaza want a long-term solution to lifting the siege of gaza, and also want a promise, a pled
, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say about because we went to bosnia and not because they were a threat to the united states of america but beca
'm happy to have that discussion with them but for them to go after the u.n. ambassador, who had nothing to do with benghazi? and was simply making a presentation based on intelligence that she had received, and besmirch her reputation? is outrageous. and, you know, we're after an election now. i think it is important for us to find out exactly what happened in benghazi and i'm happy to cooperate in any ways that congress wants. we have provided every bit of information that we have and we will continue to provide information and we've got a full-blown investigation and all that information will be disgorged to congress. and i don't think there is any debate in this country when you have four americans killed that's a problem and we've got to get to the bottom of it and there needs to be accountability. we've got to bring those who carried it out to justice. ing they won't get any debate from me on that. but when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because they think she is an easy target, then they have got a problem with me. and should i choose, if i think that she would be t
, pursued a counterproductive path at the un. i will have more to say about that tomorrow night at the forum here in washington, but for today let me offer this one thought for u.s. strategy in the region going forward -- we cannot view any of these challenges in a vacuum. they are all connected. our strategy needs to account for the intersections and relationships. for example, you cannot understand what happens in gaza without tracking the path of the rockets from iran. or how the upheaval in syria and the rise of the muslim brotherhood in egypt have affected hamas. how the treaty between egypt and israel remains the bedrock for peace in the region despite all the change going on around it. how israel's concerns over iran's nuclear program shape its overall security posture. then there are the economics of border crossings and fishing rights and concerns about smuggling and arms proliferation. the list goes on. the united states really does need to bring an unprecedented level of strategic sophistication to these -- rather than just going and chasing after the crisis of the moment. america
? some say john kerry, some have speculated about susan rice, the embattled u.n. ambassador, stepping into hillary clinton's role. >> that sounds kind of farfetched, but who knows? anything's possible. certainly, the problem susan rice would have is because of what she said about the successful raid about islamist militants on the u.s. diplomatic outpost if benghazi being the fault of a youtube video, that was very bad for her. she would compound a problem that the departure of hillary clinton would help alleviate. state department's been really under close scrutiny because of the response to this. the lack of preparation for it, for the attack and the response thereafter, that's something they would like to get away from. putting susan rice in there would intensify it. megyn: last but not least, quickly, if geithner goes, i mean, that's an important job he has. and who is likely to fill that role, and how would it change americans', you know, day-to-day lives? >> well, what the president has in tim geithner's departure is an -- or assumed departure is an opportunity to send a message
. we saw famously benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel before the u.n. with that diagram talking about the redline. what was peres's definition of that red line? is it the same as the united states? >> it's really interesting because all the talk about iran and it being the most dangerous threat to the world has -- we've heard very, very little about iran from the leaders here in israel, but we did ask president peres what he thought about if israel decided to strike iran because here in this country there has been a lot of argument and some investigative stories that have come out that show that mr. netanyahu was at odds with his military commanders as to whether or not they could have a strike on raurn done only by israel without the help of the united states and have that be a successful one. here is what the president had to say about it. >> i think that, first of all, we have we have all we have to do without any strike at home, and we have to add the time and collect the measures to bring an end to the iranian danger by economic and political pressure. this is the p
of that. i think he will keep us out of war. he may utilize the u.n. differently. we are talking about iran, but we also have north korea, with nuclear issues there. that is equally as serious as iran. i think it will be a balancing act of trying to negotiate and do things through diplomacy rather than the military. that there's a lot of talk about citizens' rights. that would bring the u.n. perspective right into the body. >> that is what i was thinking, that senator kerrey would move over to that. >> i would agree with everything they said, but with an sterisk. i have no doubt the president would like to avoid conflict wherever possible, and in particular in the middle east. but history suggests what he would like to do -- woodrow wilson was reelected on a slogan that he kept us out of work, and several months later he was asked in congress for a declaration of war. >> johnson was elected on a platform of peace. >> the second quick question, fiscal cliff, do they call a deal together before march, the end of the year? it includes a tax deal? >> yes, before march. i am not sure before
. democrats say this explains why u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice said after the attack that it was a mob protesting and anti-muslim video and not a terror strike but republicans contend the obama administration wanted to downplay terrorism from the start. >> the issue is from what was released from c.i.a. headquarters on friday afternoon in an unclassified memo to the point it was changed to the sunday morning talk shows there is a gap we need to account for and understand why it was changed. >> all the intelligence community have told us that initially they recognize there were terrorists involved but they thought it came from the protests, that it took time to sort that out. >> molly: c.i.a. talking points would have gone through numerous hands, various intelligence agencies, white house, state department, justice department before going out to lawmakers. >> gregg: so nobody is terribly forthcoming about who did it. molly henneberg, thanks very much. >> heather: illegal immigration a hot button issue and today we understand that republican lawmakers are now working on
between the palestinian factions and israel. turkish prime minister also in cairo and later today the u.n. secreta secretary-general ban ki-moon is expected to try to solidify a cessation of hostilities. the conflict is ongoing. hospital officials tell nbc news they are operating at a very limited capacity, they are afraid a ground invasion may push the health facilities here to the brink of collapse. >> thank you, we appreciate that report. eamon moyhedin. we'll have more on the tensions in the middle east throughout the morning. let's get back to this discussion that we were having and i'll make what i was trying to, what my case was, steve and jere jeremy, and even countries that deserve austerity it's easier said than done because people will immediately say you've just made it worse and you took a recession and turned it into almost a depression, so it's almost like people want you to extend the, you know, the credit card, give your wayward teenage son an additional $50,000 on the credit card and everything will be okay to avoid that. they're seeing it happening in spain. in spain th
hill today, u.s. ambassador to the u.n. commences and rice met with republican senators to discuss attacks on u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. after the meeting, senator john mccain, lindsey graham and ayotte spoke with reporters. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible] >> they are significantly troubled -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] libya as well as other americans . [inaudible] >> i'm more disturbed now than it was before -- [inaudible] [inaudible] -- an al qaeda storm in the making. i'm very disappointed in our intelligence community. i think they failed in many ways. with a little bit of inquiry and curiosity, i think it would be pretty clear that to explain this episode is related to the video they created a mob that turned into a riot was far filled. at the end of the day we're going to get to the bottom of this, we have to have a system we can trust. and if you don't know what happened, just so you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give that information. here's what i can tell you. the american people
risk picture came up very strong. we saw the u.n. security council meet last night. they didn't get a lot done. there's late reports egypt is closing borders to israel. that's not confirmed, but traders are talking about that. today, it seems even after a bullish weekly energy report, prices are going back down, especially here in the u.s.. those concerns about the fiscal cliff and weakening demand is really hurting prices right now. back to you. dennis: thunk phil flynn. cheryl: shoppers, mortgages are being sold in aisle 5. seriously. banks continue to make it tougher to refinance, and costco and wal-mart offer lopes and even business loans. professor at george mason, says the banks have nobody to blame but themselves. anthony, thank you for being here. consumer groups, advocate groups up in arms about this saying regulation needs to come down on retailers. that far into this now? >> well, the answer is this is a classic example of adam smith's invisible hand. we went through, put through the dodd-frank legislation, created a consumer protection bureau to tighten down on this stuf
not support nomination for u.n. ambassador susan rice to be next secretary of state until questions about the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya are resolved. rice met with the lee lawmakers over her initial comments about the attack which she said it stemmed from an anti-islamic video. >>> in the wake of jerry sandusky's child sex abuse trial said changes are needed they should handle how child abuse cases are handled and revamp how child abuse cases are investigated. that is the latest from fox news nit work. back to tracy and ashley. ashley: patti ann browne, thank you very much. we have another deal to announce to for greece's next debt payment. the euro touched on 1.30 earlier today. for more on all of this, i'm joined by marc chandler, global head of currency strategy at brown brothers harriman. mark, thank you for being here. we thought the euro may get a boost with the latest news that greece is getting next round of help assuming the parliaments in question agree but the only very briefly touched on the 1.30 and dropped back again. where do you see the euro going? >> ironic in
is in control of its own sovereignty, the current u.n. security counsel revolution, the current isaf operation ends. you'll need a new, sound legal basis for the new operation. we will need status of forces agreements, and the north atlantic coup sill -- council is just engaging with the afghan government on what the shape of that condition would be. there's a plan for the end of 2014, and then there's the beginnings of the negotiations about what the next mission will be. as i said, it's not a combat mission. this is part of the long term commitment at the international community, way out over what is the transformation decade that agreed that the -- there's the military building, what the international community and a broader sense, what they are doing for the substantial problems of property development, govern nans in achings, and then what individual countries, like our own, are doing in the bilateral program to be part of the whole approach in afghanistan, of course, led by the afghan government. >> right. just want to ask questions about it at some point or another and how steaning and
ambassador to the u.n. and a fox news contributor. you say today our adversaries are breathing a sigh of relief, why? >> i think they have sized up president obama during his first term. they've seen he's a weak, inch attentive leader. they are not going to wait around for us to get our economic house in order. i think almost certainly during his second term that the pace and the scope of challenges that the united states will face will accelerate. jenna: why? >> you've named some of them. because they see a president who doesn't really concern himself with foreign affairs, who doesn't see, for example, iran's continuing progress toward nuclear weapons as the threat that it is. you have president putin who has already congratulated president obama on his re-election, undoubtedly thinking of the famous conversation with former president, russian president medevev about how flexible president obama will be after the re-election. now it's come to pass. why shouldn't they be happy. jenna: let's think about what you would say to the president -- you're laughing. you can't take him off the
. for instance, on the senate side where they wound up with a couple of these un-electable candidates. candidates who said a couple of stupid things and were not the most skilled candidates to begin with. they are looking at new ways to make sure they can get -- encourage more electable candidates through money, through events. the party bosses in washington, as they could be called back home. but they may look to outside groups to do that. party leaders recognize that they need to have a little more control over who their candidates are or they are going to keep losing these unlosable races. >> like in indiana, missouri. this time two years ago in maryland and colorado, in nevada, for example. they had a relatively easy win. but they, obviously, didn't materialize. hey, mike, thanks as usual for joining us. mike allen from politico. >> wolf, thank you for your great coverage. >> suzanne? >> a cough election battle, but president obama is already staring down what may be the biggest challenge of his second term. we're talking about keeping the country from going over that imagine living your life
whether or not we saw netanyahu at that big red magic marker in front of the u.n. general assembly. we'll see what obama's next move is in that standoff. christiane amanpour, always a pleasure. thank you. >> thank you. >>> and we have the same president, the same parties in charge of both the house and the senate. now that the campaign is over, are there any hopes here that our political leaders will reach out across party lines to solve some of the big problems we face? that debate is next. ace is? maybe somewhere around my house. mine's just, right over that way. well you can find out exactly where it is using bing elections. it's a good day for politics. which way do you lean politically? conservative. republican. well, using the bing news selector you can find news from whichever way you lean. (together) social on this side, financial. which party is currently predicted to win a majority in the senate? the republicans? would you make a bet on that? no. are you chicken? a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, a
of greece, facing a default that would threaten the entire eurocurrency. finally, there is a new u.n. report saying that concentrations of greenhouse gases are up 20% since the year 2000. the report, days ahead of a climate conference reminds world government that their efforts to fight climate change are far from enough to meet their stated goals of limiting global warming. some of the headlines this hour on c-span radio. >> you career officers changed this army so that it becomes a volunteer army. by your soldiers in the villages and towns of america. we did that. over five or six years we created a splendid force of young men and women willing to serve their country as volunteers. they had the same tradition, culture, loyalty, and dedication as any other generation of americans. they prove themselves in the gulf war, the panama invasion, the last 10 years in iraq and afghanistan. the thing we have to keep in mind is something that president lincoln said during his second inaugural address. care for those who go to battle. widowed and children. to care. never forget that they are carrying
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